Aloe arbor...

Aloé arborescens

DID YOU KNOW?
The Aloe genus includes about 200 succulent species, most of them common in Southern Africa. Aloe barbadensis and Aloe arborescens were held in high repute in ancient Egypt for their medicinal virtues and they still remain to be popular.
The various benefits of the plant were supported by research on its active ingredients conducted in 1938. It was when its main active ingredients were identified but later a total of 450 different compounds were isolated from it, making it an extraordinary herb.

USE IN ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE: 

The fresh gel squeezed from the leaves was already used in the antiquity for skin care, alleviating arthralgy and rheumatism as well as treating burns and injuries. Nowadays it is even used for healing skin surfaces damaged by radiation. The pure gel is an important source of vitamins for consumption, containing numerous minerals and essential amino acids, and thus strengthening the immune system and assisting the regulation of the stomach and the bowels. It stimulates blood and lymph circulation and improves the functioning of the kidneys, the liver and gall bladder. The yellow latex between the gel and the epidermis is laxative due to its aloin content.

USE IN COSMETICS: 

In the beauty industry aloe extract is used as a moisturising, softening and abirritant substance. Skin care products containing aloe are effective for hydrating and regenerating moisture deficient, aging or tired skin. It soothes, refreshes, moisturises and supplies vitamins to the skin exposed to sun or wind and prevents environmental damage.

ACTIVE INGREDIENTS: 

Aloe capensis, Aloe barbadensis

Muco-polysaccharides (acemannon)
Amino acids
Bitter principles (aloin)
Anthraquinons
fatty acids (cholesterol, campesterol, -sitosterol),
Magnesium lactate
Mine