Nettle

Nettle ( Urtica dioica L.)

DID YOU KNOW?
Stinging nettle is one of the most significant species in the Urtica genus. There are stinging hairs (trichomes) and non-stinging hairs on the stem and leaves. Trichomes are special structures, whose tips come off when touched and the remaining part injects its acidic content (acetylcholine, histamine, serotonin) into the skin.
It has been used for various purposes as a herb, food and fibre plant. The eastern Slavs and the Ugrians living at the River Ob process it into coarse textured textile just as the case is with hemp. Tender leaves, mixed with grit, are still used for feeding ducklings.

USE IN ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE: 

It is an ingredient of depurative, diuretic teas or ones for rheumatism. The extract of its roots, as an ingredient of medicines, is effective for reducing cholesterol levels and healing prostate problems. Nowadays, modern healthy cuisine has rediscovered young nettle leaves as a source of vitamins and minerals.

USE IN COSMETICS: 

The above-ground parts are used in hair conditioning and anti-dandruff products. The herb is astringent, roborant and abirritant for scaly, seborrhoeal and itchy skin and may also be used in anti-cellulite and anti stretch mark products.

ACTIVE INGREDIENTS: 

Leaves, herb (Urticae folium, Urticae herba):
- Chlorophyll
- Carotenoids
- Vitamins (B, C, K, U)
- Triterpenes
- Sterols
- Glucoquinine
- Flavonoids (quercetin, kaempferol, isorhamnetin)
- Amines (histamine, serotonin, choline)
- Minerals

Root (Urticae radix):
- Sterols
- Coumarin
- Tannins
- Phenylpropane derivatives
- Lignan
Seed (Urticae fructus):
- Fatty oil: 30%
- Protein
- Mucilage